Cornell Orthotics and Prosthetics

Lower Limb

A Guide to Post-Op Limb Care

In the phase of post-operative limb care, your doctor may recommend the use of a shrinker to mold your residual limb and/or a PSRD for added protection against injury, facilitating a smoother recovery process.

1. Meeting with Your Prosthetist

During your first meeting with the prosthetist, a personalized journey begins. They will delve into understanding your daily activities, listen to your aspirations, and then leverage their clinical expertise to craft the perfect prosthesis tailored to your unique needs.

3. Rehabilitation Path through Physical Therapy

Your physician, prosthetist, and/or physical therapist will collaborate to guide you in adapting to your prosthesis within your daily routines. As you become proficient in basic skills, you'll progress to more advanced activities like stair climbing, driving, and engaging in sports or hobbies.

2. Initial Prosthetic Experience

Once your residual limb has adequately healed, the fitting for your custom-made prosthesis takes place. Your prosthetist will measure and tailor the prosthesis to your specifications. In addition to fitting, you will receive guidance on donning, care, and maintenance of your prosthesis.

4. Sustaining Progress with Follow-Up Care

Continued care is essential as your limb evolves. Your prosthetist will make ongoing adjustments to your prosthesis, ensuring it remains aligned with your changing needs. Regular follow-up appointments, at least every six months, are crucial to address any emerging issues, particularly as your residual limb undergoes size fluctuations.

Lower Limb

Above – knee

At Cornell Orthotics & Prosthetics, we take pride in delivering above-knee prostheses tailored to your individual requirements. Our experienced team combines cutting-edge technology with a personalized approach, ensuring the creation of a custom socket that precisely accommodates your limb. We go beyond the ordinary by carefully selecting and integrating the most suitable knee, pylon, and foot components to enhance your comfort and mobility. Trust Cornell to provide not just a prosthetic limb but a solution crafted with expertise and dedication, supporting you on your journey to renewed mobility and independence.

Below - knee

Transtibial amputation, commonly known as below-knee (BK) limb loss, refers to the absence or amputation of the leg below the knee. It is crucial to be aware of the available options and understand that a return to an independent lifestyle is achievable.

In the initial stages of your amputation process, collaboration with a prosthetist, specialized in designing, fabricating, and fitting below-the-knee artificial limbs (prostheses), is essential. Discussing your goals, expectations, and concerns with our prosthetist is crucial for addressing your specific needs. Whenever feasible, scheduling a meeting with Cornell prosthetist before the surgery is advisable to better prepare for the forthcoming challenges. The prosthetist will collaborate closely with your physician and rehabilitation team to monitor your health and ensure you are progressing toward your anticipated milestones.

Foot or partial foot

Diabetes-related complications or injuries often lead to foot amputations. If you're facing or have undergone such a procedure, remember, you're not alone.

Lower Limb

Above – knee

Below - knee

Foot or partial foot

Schedule Appointment

Whether you have inquiries or are prepared to discuss prosthetic options, feel free to give us a call and talk to one of our experts or schedule an appointment.